No Jobs in the news

Prior to the march John Harris wrote in the Guardian about universal basic income, saying:

Inventing the Future… is the key inspiration behind what Radical Assembly have planned for this Saturday. The No Jobs bloc, in fact, echoes the slogans printed in bold type on the book’s cover: “Demand full automation, demand universal basic income, demand the future.”

realmedia.press ran our piece on ‘Five reasons to march for No Jobs on April 16’:

The Huffington Post featured the “You don’t hate Mondays, you hate capitalism” banner…

… As did the Mirror.

… As did this piece on thecolumn.net entitled ‘Whistle while you work: Rihanna and the new work songs’, which said:

A recent anti-austerity protest in London saw the first ‘No Jobs bloc’, a subsection of the march for those demanding a world without work. Reinventing Guy Debord’s slogan: “Ne travaillez jamais,” “Never Work,” this kind of ‘post-work’ politics breaks from a traditional leftist position that mistrusts automation and demands full employment, by embracing technology as a means of liberating us from a whole host of tedious jobs.

And a cloud of purple smoke outside Downing Street leads off this video report on newsflare.com.

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The art of demanding the future: Metamorphosis

Artist Michelle Tylicki discusses her inspiration.

“In this metaphoric illustration I attempt to show how, with the aid of proactive design and technology, humanity can work towards the development of a life of freedom, productivity and wholesome collective evolution. The integration between technology and living organisms, stylized in the bio-mechanic transition of the butterfly’s metamorphosis stages, represents the four demands in a timeline.

If we all work towards having an equal starting point (the nourished egg) and sustainably implement automation of menial tasks (the industrious caterpillar) we will have enough time (the incubating chrysalis) to further our personal and collective growth (the liberated butterfly). This would then allow for laying the groundwork for a regenerative culture (the formation of the next egg) and the cycle continues.

My choice of an insect life cycle was a reminder to let go of the anthropocentric approach as the current system does not only affect human lives, but impacts and is interconnected with all living things on the planet. The conscious biomimicry of balanced natural processes has many such systems solutions for us all.”

Michelle blogs about art activism at proactive-art.org

The art of demanding the future: automate now

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“The cross-piece is laser cut 6mm clear perspex. The shaft is constructed of size 1 timber Full Communism Bricks (FCB). Robots can easily slot these into each other to make anything we desire, generating complexity from a set of standard bits. A metaphor for a society creating ad hoc solutions (meeting an infinite diversity of needs) from a shared infrastructure.”